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Mary Biever | One Writing Mother | Tag Archive | Social network
Tag Archive - Social network

8 Questions for a Social Media Pro Before Hiring

If you are going to hire a social media professional, what questions should you ask?

  1. What’s your Klout? Klout measures individuals’ social media impact. Its methods may not be perfect, but social pros should have a Klout score of at least 30 (most social media pros have scores much higher than 30).  When you enter a Twitter handle (must be public), you will pull the Klout score.
  2. What are your favorite platforms? A social media pro should be familiar with Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Youtube, and blogs. Pros need to understand the social media spectrum and how to best use each platform. How do they integrate Groupon offers, FourSquare, and Facebook places into campaigns?
  3. How do you build your community? Social media done well builds better communities. Do they use their Klout to bring people together? Do they share their toys? Are they involved in local, state, or national social media efforts? Do they attend or present at social media conferences or barcamps? If so, which ones, and which topics?
  4. How do you define best social media practices? How do they handle ethical issues? Do they emphasize strategy or tactic? Do they encourage open, honest dialogue?
  5. How do you have fun with social media? Good social media pros never take themselves too seriously. Fun, creative pros develop fun campaigns.
  6. How do you measure results? Your campaign strategy should have measurable goals with your specific, niche audience.
  7. What’s your time frame? Instant results from a social media campaign are as reliable as weight loss programs that promise major results in a few weeks. Do you want a quick splash or a long term gain?
  8. How do you train clients? Do they evaluate your full social media branding and train employees? If they don’t train clients, do they make referrals? Do they not only teach you how to use social media for branding but also market research?

Google your social media pro.  Evaluate their blogs, videos, and photos. Do they look like a good fit for your company and its culture? How good are they are beginning, continuing, and responding to conversations by way of Facebook, Twitter, and more?

Ask good questions. Ask the tough questions.

Better to build a strong social media presence with a solid foundation than to build one in sand that has to be fixed later.

Tragic Tweets

When I was 16, I leafed through my grandmother’s photo albums. In the trunk bottom, I opened an album of my uncle. The photo on the first page shocked me so much I set it down and cried for an hour.

I knew the story. My uncle died when he was 22, a paratrooper on leave, heading home.  His car hit a bridge embankment 3 miles from home, and he was killed instantly. My mother and her parents watched for 4 hours as they cut his body from the car.

Until that photo, I didn’t realize the horror.  A news photographer happened to stop by and take a graphic shot of the dead soldier in uniform in his car, with blood splattered everywhere. The shot was picked up by AP wires and printed in several newspapers.  My grandmother clipped the picture for the front of the album.

There was no newsworthy need for that graphic photo to be taken or printed. 

Now we see struggles between the immediate news coverage on Twitter and a family’s need for privacy.

I am grateful for real time updates on Twitter.  It’s helped me avoid traffic jams and be alert for problems.   I want to know news first.

I would hate to be in the shoes of a journalist with New Media expectations, when real time means right now.  

Now with Twitter, everyone is a journalist.  Now we can all be first to break the stories around us.

At the same time, I wonder what will be in the scrapbooks made today.  Will a mourning mother not only include a news photo but a Twitter stream of news media commentary?  Will it include screenshots of Facebook posts? Will another niece open up that scrapbook in 30 years and see graphic details that reduce her to tears?

Will that niece search Library of Congress archives and find those tweets posted in heat of the moment, from reporters and spectators? What will she read?

How do we balance real time news coverage with real life tragedies involving families whose lives can be shattered in a single moment?

How do we remember, in the impulse of the moment to post that tragedy or someone’s bad hair day that there’s a person in that photo with friends and relatives?

I have no simple answers but a final thought:

The picture we post could show the worst tragedy a family ever faces.

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Is Your Social Media Network Disaster Ready?

My grandparents survived the worst tornado in American history on March 18, 1925, when a mile-wide tornado ripped a 219 mile path of destruction across the Midwest, killing 695 people and destroying 15,000 homes.  It took days to learn who had lived or died.

When an F3 tornado struck Evansville on Sunday, November 6, 2005, killing 25 people, I thought of “The Tornado.”  Thank God we had cell phones and Internet access.

Evansville immediately responded.  Brad Gair of FEMA commented, “I don’t think I’ve ever seen a community of people come out so quickly to help each other. All communities come together after a disaster, but this one is exceptional.”  

Every church and group sought ways to help. More people wanted to help than there were means for them to do so.

I was part of a homeschool network with an email list of over 200 families in 3 states.  A Yahoo group was our social network of choice; 5 years ago, grownups avoided Facebook.

For 2 weeks, our community turned its email list into Info Central.  Each of our families connected with its own network of faith and family, and we could share information quickly.  One mom was asked one evening to prep 500 sack lunches for relief workers.  Within 2 hours, we had a church kitchen and called for volunteers/donations.  The next morning, food poured in along with volunteers.  We prepped and packed 500 lunches for the Red Cross by 10 a.m.

With our network, we got information before it hit the news.  A dad told us who to call to get listed as a volunteer.  Once areas opened, we used our list to post requests for basic needs.  If someone heard of an elderly couple with a front  yard full of trees to be cleared, we posted it, and someone helped.  I think every call for help we heard was met.

What we did by email in 2005 was an early form of what Twitter and Facebook do today.  In future disasters, I foresee mobile stations arriving to help people charge smartphones and provide emergency wi-fi access for victims.

Facebook can be more than Farmville.  It is a vital link in disaster preparedness.  

Is your social network ready for the next disaster?

(Tornado photo courtesy of Stock Xchng.)

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